Madonna on Madonna, by Madonna

hbz november 2013 madonna reem acra 2 de 150x150 Madonna on Madonna, by Madonna

THE PR VERDICT: “B” (Good Show) to Harper’s Bazaar and Madonna.

When you’re one of the most famous celebrities in the world, and have been for decades, what can there be left to say? This may have been the conundrum facing the American edition of Harper’s Bazaar once they got Madonna for their November cover.

The answer? Truth or dare: a game that has been around for ages and also the name of the 1991 documentary about Madonna. Anyone who has worked in the magazine industry can only imagine the staff fervently trying to come up with a fresh angle for the story. Truth or dare… Madonna has done many daring things in her life, hasn’t she? Let’s run with that.

And who better to examine a life lived daringly than the daredevil herself? “Madonna’s Back” reads as though Her Madgesty really wrote it; it’s not that smooth, more like a stream of consciousness. A simple idea but one that achieves the near impossible: a fresh take on a subject the world knows all too well.

THE PR VERDICT: “B” (Good Show) to Harper’s Bazaar and Madonna.

THE PR TAKEAWAY: Complex situations often benefit from simple solutions. Mark Twain once said, “When in doubt, tell the truth. It will confound your enemies and astound your friends.” Having Madonna talk about the daring art of being Madonna was a fresh take on what otherwise might have been an article that has been written before. In this age of the ghostwriter, one never knows who really wrote the story, but a look at the self-revelatory writing shows that for Madonna and her readers, this was a fresh take on a subject that has otherwise been well worn.

To read the article, click here.

The Boss Bares All

 The Boss Bares All

The PR Verdict: “B” (Almost a Winner) for Bruce Springsteen and his decision to talk to the New Yorker.

Is there something we didn’t know about Bruce Springsteen? Apparently so. Pre-publicity for the next issue of the New Yorker is generating headlines with a massive 16,000-word profile that lets readers into The Boss’s darkest secret: He has been battling depression for years.

Springsteen made the personal revelations during the weeks he was being interviewed and trailed by journalist David Remnick, the author of the profile. Advance PR tells us that Springsteen will come across to readers as a thoughtful and considerate soul with a high level of self-awareness and introspection. And, one could say, well-versed in the language of therapy.

The multi-platinum musician has been seeing a therapist since 1982. Remnick says that Springsteen avoided drugs due to the “thread of mental instability that ran through his family,” including Springsteen’s father, who battled “paralyzing depressions.” Additionally, Springsteen’s wife Patti Scialfa confirms in the article that she is bipolar. Such revelations might have been sensationalized in the hands of a lesser publication, but this elegant, straightforward bastion of publishing was the right choice to discuss an intensely personal story.

The PR Verdict: “B” (Almost a Winner) for Bruce Springsteen and his decision to talk to the New Yorker: a sensible place to discuss a wider social issue.

The PR Takeaway: Where you say something matters as much as what you say. Top marks to Springsteen for choosing the New Yorker to air an intensely personal issue. This might have gotten big airplay on E! Entertainment News and celebrity publications, but if Springsteen wanted to make some wider nuanced points, this was the way to go.

To read more, click here.

What’s your opinion of Bruce Springsteen’s decision to reveal this intensely personal information? Give us your PR Verdict!